Categories
Search
Categories

Archive for November, 2014

CHEVERUS HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER, MARY LEE KING,
ALONG WITH HER “HAITI SOLIDARITY CLUB” WON’T STAND UP AND SAY NO TO HARDBALL LEGAL TACTICS BEING EMPLOYED BY JESUIT OFFICIALS AGAINST HAITIAN CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE VICTIMS.

Jesuit educator, Mary Lee King, knows how to “talk the talk” about a Jesuit education, as exemplified by her letter to the Press Herald in March 2013.

http://www.pressherald.com/2013/03/08/catholic-schools-strive-to-welcome-all_2013-03-08/

Mary King is the moderator of the Cheverus Haiti Solidarity Club.

Despite repeated requests for her help, King refuses to involve herself in the horrific plight of the children who were raped and sodomized at a Jesuit run boarding school in Haiti.

Instead, King takes the road less traveled. King’s Haiti Club sells cupcakes and Christmas trees to help the people of Haiti.

“COME AND SEE.”

When will Mary King raise her voice, on behalf of the terribly wounded Haitian child sex abuse victims who were abused at Jesuit run, Project Pierre Toussaint, in Cap Haitien, Haiti?

http://www.nhregister.com/lifestyle/20141020/suspended-jesuit-priest-named-in-haiti-sexual-abuse-lawsuit

Here’s the question that Mrs. King and her Cheverus Haiti Club members need to ask.

Has New England Jesuit Provincial, Rev. Myles Sheehan, SJ reported the allegation of child sexual abuse against Rev. Paul Carrier, S.J. to local and US government law enforcement authorities?

What steps are being taken by Jesuit Provincial Sheehan to provide immediate resources for professional and culturally competent counseling services for the alleged child sexual abuse victim of Jesuit priest, Carrier?

Paul Kendrick
Cheverus ’68
Fairfield University ’72
297-838-1319

academics-spiritual-formation-chaplain

REV. SALLY BATES, CHAPLAIN OF DUKE UNIVERSITY’S DIVINITY SCHOOL, CONTINUES TO SUPPORT AND DEFEND MICHAEL GEILENFELD, A MULTI-ACCUSED CHILD MOLESTER IN HAITI.

THE BIGGEST FEAR OF A CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE VICTIM IS THAT, IF THEY DO TELL SOMEONE WHAT HAPPENED, THEY WON’T BE BELIEVED.

REV. BATES WILL SOON BE CALLED TO TESTIFY IN A FEDERAL CIVIL TRIAL IN PORTLAND, MAINE.

IN THAT COURTROOM, REV. BATES WILL COME FACE TO FACE WITH SEVEN HAITIAN MEN WHO WILL TESTIFY THAT THEY WERE SEXUALLY ABUSED BY GEILENFELD WHEN THEY WERE CHILDREN LIVING IN GEILENFELD’S ORPHANAGE IN HAITI.

DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL’S CHAPLAIN, SALLY BATES, WILL TESTIFY THAT ALL SEVEN OF THESE HAITIAN MEN ARE LIARS.

The Rev. Sally G. Bates (M.A., UNC-Chapel Hill; M.Div., Duke) joined the Divinity School as chaplain in 2002. She has special interest in how the arts — drama, music, and visual art — serve as the “through which” we encounter the God we so deeply hunger for. Sally is an ordained elder in the North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church. She was formerly associate pastor at Hayes Barton United Methodist Church in Raleigh. Chaplain Bates has a deep commitment to mission work in Haiti, and has led spring break retreats to Haiti.

Chaplain Bates is a former board member of Hearts with Haiti, the North Carolina based non-profit that provides financial support to the St. Joseph’s Family of Homes in Haiti.

Rev. Sally Bates / Duke University School of Divinity:
https://divinity.duke.edu/student-life/office-chaplain

BACKGROUND:

http://bangordailynews.com/2013/02/07/news/portland/nonprofit-that-raises-money-for-haiti-orphanages-school-sues-freeport-man-over-abuse-allegations/

http://www.pressherald.com/2014/09/15/before-defamation-trial-of-sex-abuse-activist-a-timely-twist/

Excerpts from the book, “Trauma and Recovery” by Judith Herman, MD

“To study psychological trauma is to come face to face with human vulnerability in the natural world and with the capacity for evil in human nature. To study psychological trauma means bearing witness to horrible events. When the events are natural disasters or “acts of God,” those who bear witness sympathize readily with the victim. But when the traumatic events are of human design, those who bear witness are caught in the conflict between victim and perpetrator. It is morally impossible to remain neutral in this conflict. The bystander is forced to take sides.”

“It is very tempting to take the side of the perpetrator. All the perpetrator asks is that the bystander do nothing. He appeals to the universal desire to see, hear and speak no evil. The victim, on the contrary, asks the bystander to share the burden of pain. The victim demands action, engagement and remembering.”

“In order to scape accountability for his crimes, the perpetrator does everything in his power to promote forgetting. Secrecy and silence are the perpetrator’s first line of defense. If secrecy fails, the perpetrator attacks the credibility of his victim. If he cannot silence her absolutely, he tries to make sure that no one listens. To this end, he marshals an impressive array of arguments, from the most blatant denial to the most sophisticated and elegant rationalization. After every atrocity one can expect to hear the same predictable apologies: it never happened; the victim lies; the victim exaggerates; the victim brought it upon herself; and in any case it is time to forget the past and move on. The more powerful the perpetrator, the greater is his prerogative to name and define reality, and the more completely his arguments prevail.”